"Protect Our Most Valuable Resource - Our Children"

Lead is a highly toxic metal that at one time was an ingredient in many household products, including lead-based paints manufactured before 1978. The primary source of lead exposure among U.S. children is the lead-based paint and lead-contaminated dust and soil found in and around old, deteriorating buildings.

Today, childhood lead poisoning is considered to be the most preventable environmental disease of young children, yet an estimated 310,000 U.S. children have elevated blood lead levels. A simple blood test can prevent a lifetime spoiled by the irreversible damage caused by lead poisoning.

While the national goal of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is to eliminate childhood lead poisoning in the United States by 2010, the goals of National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week are

To raise awareness about this serious health issue;
To emphasize the importance of screening the highest risk children younger than 6 years of age, preferably screening them by 1 to 2 years of age;
To highlight existing childhood lead poisoning prevention partnering efforts and to increase the establishment of new efforts; and
To urge people to take steps to reduce their possible exposure to lead.
As part of National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week, many state and communities plant to make official proclamations, to offer free lead screening, and to conduct various education and awareness events. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has developed posters for use by states and communities.

National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week - Poster 1 (English) http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/events/NLPPW/NLPPW2007_1.pdf
National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week - Poster 1 (Spanish) http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/events/NLPPW/NLPPW2007_1_en_espanol.pdf

National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week - Poster 2 (English) http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/events/NLPPW/NLPPW2007_2.pdf
For more information about National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week activities in your area, please contact your state or local health department.

The following are additional sources of information on childhood lead poisoning prevention:

The National Lead Information Center by calling 1-800-424-LEAD (5323) or by visiting http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/nlic.htm
CDC's Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program at http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead
EPA at http://www.epa.gov/opptintr/lead/index.html
HUD at http://www.hud.gov/offices/lead
CDC's Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program is committed to the Healthy People (http://www.healthypeople.gov/) goal of eliminating elevated blood lead levels in children by 2010. CDC continues to assist state and local childhood lead poisoning prevention programs, to provide a scientific basis for policy decisions, and to ensure that health issues are addressed in decisions about housing and the environment.

About the Program
Background, mission, future directions, program funding… http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/about/program.htm
 

Calendar of Events
Information on upcoming lead conferences, meetings, special events http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/events/calendar.htm
Data and Surveillance Resources
National and local childhood lead poisoning prevention data, surveillance assistance http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/surv/data.htm
Partnerships
Explanations of strategic partnerships formed to reduce childhood lead poisoning, MOUs… http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/partnership/partnership.htm
Policy and Legislation
National and local childhood lead poisoning prevention legislation, HIPAA… http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/Legislation%20&%20Policy/Legislation.htm
Publications
CDC childhood lead poisoning prevention publications…http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/Legislation%20&%20Policy/Legislation.htm
Resource Library
Resources for training and education/outreach…http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/resources/resources.htm
State and Local Programs

State and local childhood lead poisoning prevention program contacts, strategic elimination plans… http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/grants/contacts/CLPPP%20Map.htm
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US CDC Morbidity and Mortality Report


October 20--26, 2002, is National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week. Childhood lead poisoning is the most preventable environmental disease in young children, but approximately 1 million children still have elevated blood lead levels. One of the national health objectives for 2010 is to eliminate childhood lead poisoning in the United States (objective 8-11) ( 1). The aim of National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week is 1) to raise awareness about the importance of screening at-risk children aged 1--2 years and those aged 3--6 years who have not been previously screened and 2) to urge persons to take precautions to eliminate children's exposure to lead.

This year's theme is "Discover the Rewards of Lead-Safe Living." As part of National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week, events such as state proclamations, free lead screenings, lead-awareness community events, and educational campaigns will be conducted nationwide. CDC, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development are collaborating to coordinate activities and offer aid to local lead poisoning prevention campaigns.

Information about National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week activities is available through state or local health departments. Additional information about preventing childhood lead poisoning is available at http://cdc.gov/nceh/lead or by telephone, 800-424-5323. ( U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Healthy people 2010, 2nd ed. With understanding and improving health and objectives for improving health (2 vols). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2000. )

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency



Press Release: NATIONAL LEAD POISONING PREVENTION WEEK OCTOBER 21-27
David Deegan, 202-564-7839 / deegan.dave@epa.gov

EPA and communities across the United States between Oct. 21-27, will be marking the 3rd National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week by raising awareness about lead poisoning through health fairs for families, lead tests for children and presentations for property owners. Thousands of children each year are exposed to lead in older homes with lead paint hazards. These hazards can include lead dust from renovations or deteriorated lead paint, as well as lead-contaminated soil and water. Children who are lead poisoned often suffer from learning disabilities, brain and central nervous system damage and other physical effects. EPA has recently developed a nutrition brochure to help parents understand the connection between lead poisoning and the foods children eat. Studies show that a low-fat diet rich in iron, calcium and vitamin C can help to reduce the effects of lead. Lead poisoning is entirely preventable. As part of National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week, families are encouraged to get homes and children tested for lead. For more information on activities happening in your area, contact your local health or housing department. To learn how to protect your family from lead hazards or to get a copy of EPA's Nutrition and Lead Poisoning brochure, call the National Lead Information Center at 800-424-LEAD (424-5323) or go to EPA's web site at: http://www.epa.gov/lead/ .


Other Information

Read about Lead Poisoning Prevention Week activities http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/lppwregion.htm around the nation. En español http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/lppwregionsp.htm

Learn How You Can Prevent Lead Poisoning http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/lppw2007.htm#1
Testing for Lead http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/lppw2007.htm#2
Lead in Drinking Water http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/lppw2007.htm#3
Other Resources http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/lppw2007.htm#4
En español http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/lppw2007sp.htm

EPA observes National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week to highlight the importance of educating parents and children about the dangers of lead exposure, especially lead-paint hazards in housing. This year's theme, "Protect Our Most Valuable Resource -- Our Children," highlights the importance of educating parents about the dangers of lead-based paint.
http://www.epa.gov/epahome/pdf.html

Lead exposure among young children has been drastically reduced over the last three decades due to federal, state and local regulations concerning:

The phase-out of lead from gasoline and house paint; and
Reductions of lead in industrial emissions, drinking water, consumer goods, hazardous sites and other sources.
As a result of these past and on-going efforts, children's blood-lead levels have declined dramatically since the mid-1970s. In 1978, there were about 13.5 million children in the United States with elevated blood-lead levels. Currently, approximately 310,000 children ages 1-5 years in the United States have blood-lead levels greater than the Centers for Disease Control recommended level of 10 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood.

The federal government's goal is to eliminate childhood lead poisoning in the United States as a major public health problem by the year 2010.

For more information, please see Eliminating Childhood Lead Poisoning: A Federal Strategy Targeting Lead Paint Hazards (PDF) (91 pp, 1.5 MB, About PDF). http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/fedstrategy2000.pdf

You will need the free Adobe Reader to view some of the files on this page.
See EPA's PDF page to learn more. http://www.epa.gov/epahome/pdf.html

Learn How You Can Prevent Lead Poisoning

Become familiar with the EPA Lead Awareness Program and the following resources:


Education and outreach brochures provide information to parents and children on the importance of testing children for lead, testing homes and working safely when lead is present in the home environment. http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/leadpbed.htm

Information and brochures en español:
El medio ambiente y su salud: Plomo http://www.epa.gov/espanol/saludhispana/plomo.htm
Combata el envenenamiento con plomo con una dieta saludable (PDF) (10pp, 230 KB) http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/nutritionsp.pdf
Proteja a su familia en contra del plomo en su casa (PDF) (16pp, 649 KB) http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/leadpdfs.pdf
Reduccion de los riesgos de contaminación por plomo cuando remodelar su casa (PDF) (26pp, 412 KB) http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/span_web_secure.pdf
Cartel "El envenenamiento por el plomo y sus niños" (PDF) (para leer el cartel imprimirolo) (2pp, 167 KB) http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/lpandycs.pdf
Déle A Su Niño La Oportunidad De Su Vida, Mantenga A Su Niño Libre Del Plomo (PDF) (6pp, 436 KB) http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/chance_span.pdf

Brochures in additional languages:

Protect Your Family From Lead in Your Home

Vietnamese (PDF) (16pp, 946 KB) http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/leadvn.pdf
Russian (PDF) (17pp, 665 KB) http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/pyf_russian.pdf
Arabic (PDF) (17pp, 611 KB) http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/pyf_arabic.pdf
You should also become familiar with Rules and Regulations,http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/regulation.htm such as the Disclosure Rule http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/leadbase.htm . This rule requires persons selling or leasing housing constructed before 1978 to disclose known lead-based paint and/or lead-based paint hazards during all real-estate transactions.

Testing for Lead

To protect children, parents should ask their health care providers about testing children for high levels of lead in the blood.

Homeowners may contact the National Lead Information Center at 1-800-424-LEAD (5323) for information on how to find professionals to test houses for lead.

Tenants can also consult with their landlords regarding testing pre-1978 residences when there are signs of deteriorating lead-based paint.



Other Resources

Other federal agencies, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Department of Housing and Urban Development,http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/events/NLPPW/leadweek2007.htm plan to conduct various education and awareness events for Lead Poisoning Prevention Week. Learn more about other National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week activities across the United States. http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/lppwregion.htm

For more information about Lead Poisoning Prevention Week or lead poisoning in general, contact the National Lead Information Center at 1-800-424-LEAD or see EPA's Lead Website.
http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/events/NLPPW/leadweek2007.htm

http://www.epa.gov/lead/index.html